The views expressed in any article published in this blog are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Joseph Foster or Bob Lupoli.

Friday, January 27, 2012

Wet House: Free Rooms for Seattle's Street Drunks


Joe:  I was shocked to hear that Seattle is providing free housing to homeless street drunks. Couldn’t Seattle find a better use for their money, maybe helping battered women, poor children, the elderly? This is what is wrong with the country, the is a world of people  willing to make excuses for others bad behavior. By the way who cares if their drinking went down to only 12 drinks a day! I imagine they are using other drugs as well.  Are these researchers actually following people around, aren’t they biased in providing figures that justify their jobs and their research? It should be an independent group that provides the data to determine “success” of this program.  -Bob
 
1811 Eastlake Ave Seattle, WA 98101
 
Study: Housing helps street alcoholics drink less
By DONNA GORDON BLANKINSHIP
Associated Press
An innovative program that takes homeless alcoholics off the street and gives them a place to live without requiring them to quit drinking has led residents to dramatically decrease their drinking as well as ease problems related to their addiction, new research has found.

The study found residents of the Seattle apartment building cut their heavy drinking by 35 percent and their everyday drinking by about 50 percent during their first two years in the building. They also had fewer instances of delirium tremens, a life-threatening form of alcohol withdrawal.

Researchers found the 95 formerly homeless men and women decreased the number of drinks they consumed on their heaviest drinking days from 40 to 26 over two years. The median number of drinks dropped from 22 to 11 drinks during a typical drinking day.

Study: Housing program helps street alcoholics drink less
The innovative program has led residents to dramatically decrease their drinking as well as ease problems related to their addiction, new research has found.

Mike Snow
It Pays to House Homeless Alcoholics: A two-year UW study proves that residents of 1811 Eastlake—a controversial "wet house" for chronically homeless alcoholics—drink half the amount per day they were imbibing on the streets, on average. What's more, "housing homeless alcoholics cut the cost to taxpayers for police, medical and social services by 50 percent," reports King5.

SEATTLE (AP)
In a story about research on formerly homeless people living in a housing project for alcoholics, The Associated Press incorrectly reported the number of drinks consumed by the residents. The study found the residents cut their everyday drinking by about 40 percent during their first two years in the building. The median number of drinks dropped from 20 to 12 during a typical drinking day.

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